The first few weeks

If you go back to work and hand over your child to someone else to care for, your emotions may run riot. It's important to establish a routine for you and your child so things quickly settle down.

Getting into a new routine
While you may find being separated from your baby difficult, it's important that you give her the right messages so she feels confident about what's happening. Always talk positively about her childcare when she's around. Also keep a close eye on her progress, so you can judge if she's settling in well.

Telephone your carer
Good childcare providers will welcome you ringing as often as you need to reassure yourself that all's well.

If you find your mind wandering during the day, give the carer another ring to find out how your baby's doing and what she's been up to.

Ease yourself in
If you can afford it, see if your employer will let you start back to work part-time for the first couple of weeks. This gives you and your baby more time to adjust. Alternatively, try leaving your baby with the carer for a few sessions before you return to work.

Quick visits
If you work close to where your baby is or are lucky enough to have a workplace nursery, it's tempting to pop back at lunchtime to see how your baby is doing.

This is fine as long as she's not going to get distressed when you go away again, which usually happens from around six to eight months. Don't drop in if she's unsettled by your visits.

You, too, may find it distressing to leave her twice in one day. However, if you're breastfeeding, calling in to give a lunchtime feed can be a great way to carry on longer.

Say goodbye
A big kiss and cuddle, followed by a clear "Bye, bye, see you later", are essential. By clearly indicating that you're leaving, she'll come to understand that there's a pattern to the day, and that you do come back when you say you will.

Source: BBC
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